Free Wallpaper and Backgrounds


HomeHome
Information Index
AntelopeAntelope
BadgersBadgers
BearsBears
BeaverBeaver
BirdsBirds
  BatsBats
  CranesCranes
  GeeseGeese
  EaglesEagles
  FlamingosFlamingos
  HawksHawks
  HeronsHerons
  HummingbirdsHummingbirds
  MacawsMacaws
  OstrichOstrich
  OwlsOwls
  PeacocksPeacocks
  PelicansPelicans
  PenguinPenguin
  PuffinPuffin
  RoadrunnersRoadrunners
  RosellaRosella
  SeagullsSeagulls
  StorksStorks
  SwansSwans
  TernsTerns
  ToucansToucans
  WoodpeckersWoodpeckers
BisonBison
BuffaloBuffalo
CamelsCamels
CatsCats
  Black PantherBlack Panther
  BobcatBobcat
  CaracalCaracal
  CheetahCheetah
  CougarCougar
  JaguarsJaguars
  LeopardsLeopards
  LionsLions
  LynxLynx
  MargaysMargays
  MeerkatsMeerkats
  OcelotsOcelots
  ServalsServals
  TigersTigers
ChipmunksChipmunks
CowsCows
CoyoteCoyote
DeerDeer
DolphinDolphin
ElephantElephant
ElkElk
FishFish
FoxesFoxes
GiraffeGiraffe
GoatsGoats
Ground HogsGround Hogs
Hedge HogsHedge Hogs
HippopotamusHippopotamus
HorsesHorses
HyenaHyena
KangarooKangaroo
ManateeManatee
MarmotMarmot
MinkMink
MonkeysMonkeys
MooseMoose
Musk OxMusk Ox
OpossumOpossum
OrcasOrcas
OttersOtters
PorcupinePorcupine
Prairie DogPrairie Dog
RabbitsRabbits
SharkShark
SheepSheep
SkunksSkunks
SquirrelsSquirrels
RaccoonRaccoon
ReptilesReptiles
  AlligatorAlligator
  CrocodilesCrocodiles
  FrogsFrogs
  LizardsLizards
  SnakesSnakes
  TurtlesTurtles
RhinoRhino
SealsSeals
WeaselsWeasels
WarthogsWarthogs
WhalesWhales
WolfWolf
WolverineWolverine
ZebrasZebras

 
All Things Peacock.
Information and pictures on Peacocks.
Educational, Zoological, and Classification info.

Back

Index

The term Peacock or Peafowl can refer to the two species of bird in the genus Pavo of the pheasant family, Phasianidae. The African Congo Peafowl is placed in its own genus Afropavo and is not dealt with here. Peafowl are best known for the male's extravagant tail, which it displays as part of courtship. The male is called a peacock, the female a peahen, though it is common to hear the female also referred to as a "peacock" or "female peacock". The female peafowl is brown or toned grey and brown.

The two species are: Peacocks

  • Indian Peafowl, Pavo cristatus (Asiatic)
  • Green Peafowl, Pavo muticus (Asiatic)

The Indian Peafowl is a resident breeder in the Indian subcontinent. The peacock is designated as the national bird of India.

The Green Peafowl breeds from Myanmar east to Java. The IUCN lists the Green Peafowl as vulnerable to extinction due to hunting and a reduction in extent and quality of habitat.

Taxonomy
The term peafowl originated from the word peacukgud , while the Green Peafowl has 3 subspecies, P. muticus spicifer, P. m imperator and the nominate P. m. muticus.

The two species are largely allopatric but will hybridise in captivity.

While the form of Green Peafowl in Yunnan is not separated taxonomically, it differs in a few aspects from other forms, particularly in its forest-dwelling habits, an "odd, monal-like bill", a curiously long hind toe and longer, more slender wings (K. B. Woods in litt. 2000). Some have suggested this is a new subspecies.

Some pheasant breeders have suggested that the Green Peafowl may have more subspecies.
Peafowl have sometimes been included in a distinct family from Pheasants .

Plumage
The male (peacock) Indian Peafowl has iridescent blue-green or green colored Peacocksplumage. The so-called "tail" of the peacock, also termed the "train", is not the tail quill feathers but highly elongated upper tail coverts. The train feathers have a series of eyes that are best seen when the tail is fanned. Both species have a head crest.

The female (peahen) Indian Peafowl has a mixture of dull green, brown, and grey  in her plumage. She lacks the long upper tail coverts of the male but has a crest. Females can also display their plumage to ward off danger to their young or other female competition.

The Green Peafowl is very different in appearance to the Indian Peafowl. The male has green and gold plumage and has an erect crest. The wings are black with a sheen of blue.

Unlike the Indian Peafowl, the Green Peahen is very similar to the male, only having shorter upper tail coverts and less iridescence. It is very hard to tell a juvenile male from an adult female.

Many of the brilliant colors of the peacock plumage are due to an optical interference phenomenon (Bragg reflection) based on (nearly) periodic nanostructures found in the barbules (fiber-like components) of the feathers.

Different colors correspond to different length scales of the periodic structures. For brown feathers, a mixture of red and blue is required: one color is created by the periodic structure, and the other is a created by a Fabry-Perot interference peak from reflections off the outermost and innermost boundaries of the periodic structure.

Such interference-based structural color is especially important in producing the peacock's iridescent hues (which shimmer and change with viewing angle), since interference effects depend upon the angle of light, unlike chemical pigments.

Behavior
The peafowl are forest birds that nest on the ground. The Pavo peafowl are terrestrial feeders but roost in trees.

Both species of Peafowl are believed to be polygamous. However, it has beenPeacocks suggested that "females" entering a male Green Peafowl's territory are really his own juvenile or subadult young (K. B. Woods in litt. 2000) and that Green Peafowl are really monogamous in the wild. Those who subscribe to this notion cite the similarities between the sexes.
During mating season they will often emit a very loud high pitched cry.

Diet
Peafowl are omnivorous and eat plant parts, flower petals, seed heads, insects and other arthropods, reptiles, and amphibians.

In common with other members of the Galliformes, males possess metatarsal spurs or "thorns" used primarily during intraspecific fights.

Habitat
Asiatic peafowl are nasties like the Indian Blue Peafowl and especially the Green Peafowl occupy a similar niche as the roadrunners, secretary bird, and seriema. All of these birds hunt for small animals including arthropods on the ground and tall grass and minnows in shallow streams.

Because of human encroachment into their natural territories, peafowl and humans have come into increasing contact. Because of their natural beauty some are reluctant to classify the birds as pests, but their presence can be disturbing.

Peafowl as national symbols
The Peacock has been used by many nations as a national symbol.

The Peacock is the national bird of India.

Though the national bird of Myanmar is the Grey Peacock-pheasant, the Peacock is still a prominent symbol of Myanmar. The Dancing Peacock (the Peacock in courtship or in display of his feathers) was numerously featured in Myanmar monarchic flags as well as other nationalist symbols in the country such as coins, medals and emblems. Early 20th century Myanmar banknotes also featured Peacocks. The Fighting Peacock, as symbolic representation, is also associated with decades long democratic struggle against military dictatorship in the country. The latter closely resembles a Green Peafowl, as it has a tufted crest.

Scientific classification

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Galliformes
Family: Phasianidae
Genus: Pavo  Linnaeus, 1758

Species

Pavo cristatus
Pavo muticus

Indian Peacock
The Indian Peacock or Peafowl, Pavo cristatus also known as the Common Peafowl or the Blue Peafowl is one of the species of bird in the genus Pavo of the Phasianidae family known as peafowl. The Indian Peafowl is a resident breeder in the Indian subcontinent. The peacock is the national bird of India.
The species is found in dry semi-desert grasslands, scrub and deciduous forests. It forages and nests on the ground but roosts on top of trees. It eats mainly seeds, but also some insects, fruits and reptiles.
Females are about 86 cm (34 in) long and weigh about 3.4 kg (7.4 lbs), while males average at about 2.12 m (7.3 ft) in full breeding plumage (107 cm/42 in when not) and weigh about 5 kg (11 lbs). The male is called a peacock, the female a peahen. The Indian Peacock has iridescent blue-green plumage. The upper tail coverts on its back are elongated and ornate with an eye at the end of each feather. These are the Peacock's display feathers. The female plumage is a mixture of dull green, grey and iridescent blue, with the greenish-grey predominating. In the breeding season, females stand apart by lacking the long 'tail feathers' also known as train, and in the non-breeding season they can be distinguished from males by the green color of the neck as opposed to the blue on the males.
Peafowl are most notable for the male's extravagant display feathers, despite actually growing from their back is known as a 'tail' and also known as a train, a result of sexual selection, which it displays as part of courtship. This train is in reality not the tail but the enormously elongated upper tail coverts. The tail itself is brown and short as in the peahen.

Green Peacock
The Green Peacock or Peafowl, Pavo muticus, also known as the Dragonbird, is a large member of the Galliformes order. Some new data suggests that the Green Peafowl is actually several species (Kermit Blackwood et al.). Any hard scientific data supporting multiple species remain unpublished and it is therefore currently classified as a single species with three subspecies; P. m. muticus (nominate), P. m. imperator and P. m. spicifer
While peafowl are often considered members of the pheasant family, recent molecular work has shown that the Phasianidae is paraphyletic, and that peafowl are not closely related to pheasants, grouse or turkeys. They are distantly related to junglefowl and francolins however, and share a common ancestor with Coturnix quail and Alectoris Rock Partridges. While this has yet to be published, the World Pheasant Association of Germany already lists peafowl as a distinct family.
Like other members of the genus Pavo, Green Peafowl is a colorful bird. Iridescent plumage may be a highly specialized form of crypsis that is useful in open forests and near water. Most predatory species like leopards and tigers, wild dogs, civets, owls and hawk-eagles that have been documented hunting peafowl do not have color vision.
Green Peafowls are found today in Southeast Asia in easternmost northern India, Assam, mainland Myanmar, Tibet, Yunnan, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia and on the island of Java in Indo

 

Top

Go Back

Are You Looking for a new WEB HOSTING Provider?
We have partnered with RSH Web Services.
Together we offer you one of the best web hosting packages
you can find anywhere.
  
Click here for details

 



Wallpaper, backgrounds, images and pictures located below

AntelopeAntelope Badgers BearsBadgers Bears Beaver Otters MuskratBeaver Otters BirdsBirds
Buffalo CowsBuffalo (Bison) Cow Camels GiraffeCamels Giraffe CatsCats Chipmunks SquirrelChipmunks Squirrel
Deer ElkDeer Elk Dolphin SharkDolphin Shark Elephant RhinoElephant Rhinoceros FishFish
Goats SheepGoats Sheep Ground Hedge HogsGround-Hedge Hogs HippopotamusHippopotamus Horses ZebrasHorses Zebras
Hyena WarthogsHyena Warthogs InsectsInsects JetsJets KangarooKangaroo
Landscapes FlowersLandscape Flowers ManateeManatee Marmot MinkMarmot Mink AnimalsMiscellaneous Animals
MonkeysMonkeys Moose MuskOxMoose Musk Ox Planes HelicoptersPlanes Helicopters Porcupines OpossumPorcupine Opossum
Rabbits SkunksRabbits Skunks Raccoon PrairieDogRaccoon Prairie Dog Alagators Frogs Lizards Snakes TurtelsReptiles Seals Whale OrcasSeals Whale Orcas
ShipsShips Weasels WolverineWeasels Wolverine Wolf Coyote FoxesWolf Coyote Foxes  

RSH Web Hosting